Stately home clipart lds

In England, the terms “country house” and “stately home” are sometimes used vaguely and interchangeably; however, many country houses such as Ascott in Buckinghamshire were deliberately designed not to be stately, and to harmonise with the landscape, while some of the great houses such as Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall were built as “power houses” to dominate the landscape, and were most certainly intended to be “stately” and impressive. In his book Historic Houses: Conversations in Stately Homes, the author and journalist Robert Harling documents nineteen “stately homes”; these range in size from the vast Blenheim palace to the minuscule Ebberston Hall, and in architecture from the Jacobean Renaissance of Hatfield House to the eccentricities of Sezincote. The book’s collection of stately homes also includes George IV’s Brighton town palace, the Royal Pavilion.

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